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I am easily satisfied with the very best.
Winston Churchill

![Laura Pic]--(/Images/Laura)


![Sherwood Pic]--(/Images/Sherwood)


![Dog pix]--(/Images/Dogs)

My nephews started a game of giving the dogs fancy names.

Radar came to us as AK2773921 from the Calgary Pound. The name was awkward. Large ears made him “Radar” The circling tail made him Radar Rotifer. (Google rotifer on youtube.) He was a pretty good watch dog. Radar Rotifer Rolex. (High class watch for a high class dog.) Now he’s Radar Rotifer Rolex, Sir Galumph the Graceless, (He’s always tripping over his own feet) Warden of the Western Marches, Water Walker, (On his first hike he started afraid of crossing streams. A week later he was charging through.) Thunder Paws. (Non carpeted stairs...)

Sandy, the fuzzy mostly black chunky one, is “Her Excellency, The Lady Kassandra Jane, First Fang of the Forest, Protector of the Realm, She’s sudden death on pocket gophers) Soul Singer, (she has a sound between a growl and a whine that she tries to talk to us with ) Greedy Guts Lunch Mouth the Third. (Radar will likely be GGLM IV on her passing) Sandy was an ad in the local paper, “free to good home” She came in at age 4 or 5, and initially was very timid.

Ceilidh (Kaylee) is the one that actually looks like a border collie. She was free to good home too. She is a serious pet-a-holic. We have tried several times to get her into PA’s 12 Step Program, but she won’t admit she has a problem. Anyway her full name is Princess Ceilidgh, Dancing Girl, Snoozle Dog, Sticky Butt (At night we get enough wild raspberry twigs out of her fur to start the fire.) Knight Commander of the Loyal Order of the Breadcrust (She heels well)

Who are we?

A Brief History

Sherwood says, "We started growing trees in 2000, but didn't really get serious about it until 2003. It was a serious hobby. Something to keep me busy after I retired. (Hah! Busier than a one handed wall paper hanger...)

"One of our startup rules: Don't borrow money. It might not work. I had no previous experience. Neither did Laura. Let's not get in over our head. So we sunk a few thousand bucks each year out of our paychecks.

"In 2008 the school I was working at closed, and Laura said that it was time to go full time.

"Originally we were going to be wholesale. I couldn't see customers driving 45 minutes from Edmonton for retail purchases. But it didn't work out that way. We don't work on a wholesale scale. We don't do 5 million trees a year, like Bylands. But neither are we really retail. Most of our customers are somewhere in between. Many are acreage owners. We sell them trees big enough to miss with the mower, small enough to plant with a shovel. Others are interested in edible landscaping. We sell forty odd kinds of fruit trees and shrubs. Lately there is increasing interest in native plants.

Laura says "If someone had told me 30 years ago that I would one day be living and working on an 80 acre tree farm, learning accounting, I'd have smiled politely and backed away slowly. And yet, here I am. Sherwood is, and always has been, the green thumb in the family. It's not that I don't like trees, or plants in general, because I do. I love our natural forest and meeting the people who come out to buy our trees. Sherwood has the big picture mind and I have the detail mind, which makes for good teamwork.

Once Sherwood took on the tree farm full-time, I became the traditional farmer's wife and continued to work part-time in the city to keep the daily living expenses paid. It was a big moment, in 2014, when we decided it was time for both of us to concentrate on the tree farm. We haven't looked back.

Our deliberately low overhead costs have allowed us to concentrate on providing a good product, at a reasonable price, with all the in-person assistance and advice a person could ask for. Trees we don't sell this year, will be sold next year. Or the year after that. Growing them in pots, outdoors, summer and winter means that we can call our trees "Alberta hardy" with confidence. Keeping all facets of our business in-house (we do have outside help with our taxes -- life is just too short for some things) means that we can respond quickly and personally to all inquiries. It means a great deal to us to have increasing numbers of return customers every year."



Got something to say? Email me: sfinfo@sherwoods-forests.com

Want to talk right now? Talk to me: (8 am to 9 pm only, please) 1-780-848-2548


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Copyright © 2008 - 2016 S. G. Botsford

Sherwood's Forests is located about 75 km southwest of Edmonton, Alberta. Please refer to the map on our Contact page for directions.